<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none;" alt="" src="https://dc.ads.linkedin.com/collect/?pid=182073&amp;fmt=gif">

RBB To Host Lunch & Learn Series

"How to Save Money in a High-Mix, Low-Volume World"

RBB will host a four-part lunch & learn series quarterly in 2019-2020.  The goal of this series will be to educate RBB's partners on how to save money in our high-mix, low-volume PCBA industry. Each session includes a hands-on presentation from RBB team members or suppliers, FREE lunch, networking, and a facility tour.

Is Visual Inspection Enough When Manufacturing High-Quality PCB Electronics?

Visual Inspection and Small Batch Electronics

How can a contract manufacturer ensure that it is providing its small batch electronics manufacturing client with the highest quality product when functional testing is not an option? In an effort to reduce costs, many customers will specify that a visual inspection of their completed assembly is to be the final quality control measure prior to shipping. Some of these assemblies can be pretty complex, consisting of hundreds of surface-mount and through-hole components. Each component and its associated solder joints (or another connection method) must be examined. It requires a team of well-trained, dedicated professionals with impeccable attention to detail to successfully complete this requirement.   

What Can I Do To Help Reduce Production Cost and Lead Time in my PCB Assembly?

Design for Manufacturability

Design for Manufacturability (DFM) is the process of designing your product so that it can be produced easily and quickly. A few adjustments can help you get your new product to market before your competition, and help you meet your delivery schedules! The fewer steps in the electronics manufacturing process means less time between ordering and receiving your product. 

“High-Mix, Low-Volume” and “Small Batch” are NOT the Same Thing

In the EMS industry, the term high-mix, low-volume (HMLV) refers to CMs or OEMs who change over production between assemblies and processes much more often than their low-mix, high-volume (LMHV) counterparts. HMLV shops convert their lines to different assemblies rapidly (hours or minutes) and frequently (several shifts or days). Note that the opportunity for error rises as batch size decreases.

By contrast, LMHV production runs can last weeks or even months between change overs. It’s a different animal altogether.

RBB builds many hundreds of unique assemblies annually and most weeks introduces multiple new assemblies. It's rare that RBB runs a batch large enough to consume an entire shift of time, much less a few shifts!

New Call-to-action